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Cookies Policy

Our website uses cookies. [We will ask you to consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy when you first visit our website. By using our website and agreeing to this policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy ].

(1) Credit

This document was created using an SEQ Legal template.

(2) About cookies

A cookie is a file containing an identifier (a string of letters and numbers) that is sent by a web server to a web browser, and stored by the browser. The identifier is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server.

Cookies can be used by web servers to identity and track users as they navigate different pages on a website and to identify users returning to a website.

Cookies may be either "persistent" cookies or "session" cookies. A persistent cookie consists of a text file sent by a web server to a web browser, which will be stored by the browser and will remain valid until its set expiry date (unless deleted by the user before the expiry date). A session cookie, on the other hand, will expire at the end of the user session, when the web browser is closed.

1. This cookies policy template will help you to comply with the law relating to web cookies.

The key piece of legislation in the UK relating to cookies is the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003. The cookies policy will also help you to comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 insofar as it affects the use of web cookies.

Regulation 6 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (as amended) provides that:

"(1) Subject to paragraph (4), a person shall not store or gain access to information stored, in the terminal equipment of a subscriber or user unless the requirements of paragraph (2) are met.

(2) The requirements are that the subscriber or user of that terminal equipment - (a) is provided with clear and comprehensive information about the purposes of the storage of, or access to, that information; and (b) has given his or her consent.

(3) Where an electronic communications network is used by the same person to store or access information in the terminal equipment of a subscriber or user on more than one occasion, it is sufficient for the purposes of this regulation that the requirements of paragraph (2) are met in respect of the initial use.

(4) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to the technical storage of, or access to, information - (a) for the sole purpose of carrying out or facilitating the transmission of a communication over an electronic communications network; or (b) where such storage or access is strictly necessary for the provision of an information society service requested by the subscriber or user."

This cookies policy should be used in conjunction with or as a part of a full privacy policy.

Please note that, in order to use this template, you may need to speak to your web developer about the cookies used on your website and the purposes for which they are used. Obviously, if your website does not use cookies, you will not need a cookies policy.

The inclusion of this statement in your privacy policy will not necessarily satisfy the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 as regards consent to the use of cookies. Guidance concerning methods of obtaining such consent is included on the Information Commissioner's website (http://www.ico.gov.uk).

2. The inclusion of this statement in your privacy policy will not necessarily satisfy the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 as regards consent to the use of cookies. Guidance concerning methods of obtaining such consent is included on the Information Commissioner's website (http://www.ico.gov.uk).

(3) Cookies on this website

We use [both/only] [session cookies] [and] [persistent cookies] on this website.

(4) How we use cookies

Cookies do not contain any information that personally identifies you, but personal information that we store about you may be linked, by us, to the information stored in and obtained from cookies.

We may use the information we obtain from your use of our cookies for the following purposes:

(1) [to recognise your computer when you visit our website;]

(2) [to track you as you navigate our website, and to enable the use of the [specify feature - e.g. shopping cart] on our website;]

(3) [to improve the website's usability;]

(4) [to analyse the use of our website;]

(5) [in the administration of this website;]

(6) [to prevent fraud and improve the security of the website;]

(7) [to personalise our website for you[, including targeting advertisements which may be of particular interest to you]].

(5) Third party cookies

When you use our website, you may also be sent third party cookies.

Our [advertisers/service providers] may send you cookies. They may use the information they obtain from your use of their cookies:

(1) [to track your browser across multiple websites;]

(2) [to build a profile of your web surfing;]

(3)[to target advertisements which may be of particular interest to you.]

[In addition, we use [Google Analytics] to analyse the use of this website. [Google Analytics] generates statistical and other information about website use by means of cookies, which are stored on users' computers. The information generated relating to our website is used to create reports about the use of the website. [Google] will store this information. [Google's] privacy policy is available at: [http://www.google.com/privacypolicy.html.]] ]

3. Specify here the uses to which you will put cookies and the data that you collect from cookies.

4. If you do not use Google Analytics, you should check whether your analytics system uses cookies and include an appropriate explanatory paragraph if it does.

[Our advertising services providers may send you cookies for the purpose of enabling the service of advertisements based on your previous visits to our website.]

[We publish Google Adsense interest-based advertisements on our website. These are tailored by Google to reflect your interests. To determine your interests, Google will track your behaviour on our website and on other websites across the web using the DART cookie. You can view, delete or add interest categories associated with your browser using Google's Ads Preference Manager, available at: http://www.google.com/ads/preferences/. You can opt-out of the Adsense partner network cookie at: http://www.google.com/privacy/ads/ or using the NAI's (Network Advertising Initiative's) multi-cookie opt-out mechanism at: http://www.networkadvertising.org/managing/opt_out.asp. However, these opt-out mechanisms use cookies, and if you clear the cookies from your browser your opt-out will not be maintained. To ensure that an opt-out is maintained in respect of a particular browser, you should use the Google browser plug-in available at: http://www.google.com/ads/preferences/plugin.]

(6) Blocking cookies

Most browsers allow you to refuse to accept cookies. For example:

(1) in Internet Explorer you can refuse all cookies by clicking "Tools", "Internet Options", "Privacy", and selecting "Block all cookies" using the sliding selector;

(2) in Firefox you can block all cookies by clicking "Tools", "Options", and un-checking "Accept cookies from sites" in the "Privacy" box.

Blocking all cookies will, however, have a negative impact upon the usability of many websites. [If you block cookies, you will not be able to use the [identify feature(s)] on this website.]

(7) Deleting cookies

You can also delete cookies already stored on your computer:

(1) in Internet Explorer, you must manually delete cookie files (you can find instructions for doing so at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/278835);

(2) in Firefox, you can delete cookies by, first ensuring that cookies are to be deleted when you "clear private data" (this setting can be changed by clicking "Tools", "Options" and "Settings" in the "Private Data" box) and then clicking "Clear private data" in the "Tools" menu.

Doing this may have a negative impact on the usability of many websites.

(8) Contact us

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Child Custody Law - Joint Custody UK Divorce

Quick Enquiry

Child custody law in the context of UK divorce legislation refers to the way in which the courts determine who should have the care and control of a child in separation or divorce proceedings. In is now common for parents to have joint custody whereby each parent has the right to participate in important parental decisions although the child continues to reside in the main with just one of the parents.

If parents cannot agree on the living arrangements for a child, the courts will make a decision for them, generally based on what is in the best interests of the child which is not always based on the best arguments put forward by either of the parents. In general terms the UK courts tend to award physical custody to the parent who demonstrates the most financial security, adequate parenting skills and the least disruption for the child tempered with the arguable view that younger children are usually better off with their mother and older boys are better off with their father.

Although these cases can give rise to some of the most bitter disputes in the UK divorce courts, most child custody law cases end amicably with former spouses agreeing to custody (frequently joint custody), access, and maintenance from the non-custodial parent however in disputed cases the parents are judged on the relative fitness of each parent to raise children and in certain unusual and very rare cases a parent may be effectively permanently denied access. It is important to note however that after proceedings the court has the right to change its mind at any time following application by either parent to reconsider the arrangements and this is particularly useful if new evidence comes to light or if one parent’s circumstances or behaviour changes.

If you are having matrimonial difficulties and you cannot agree on maintenance, custody or access issues with you former partner we can assist you to come to get a fair and equitable arrangement in place. We initially try to settle cases with the consent of both parties however if this becomes impossible we will make applications to the court for an order to achieve the desired result. Our services cover the whole range of child custody law and include:-

  • Representation in disputed custody applications.
  • Applications by the non custodial parent for custody or access.
  • Applications for joint custody.
  • Applications for access through a contact order for a non married parent.
  • Enforcement of pre-existing access orders that are being ignored by the custodial parent.
  • Applications by a non married parent for a Parental Responsibility Order.
  • Application for a Prohibited Steps Order if there are fears that a child may be taken out of the UK.
  • Assistance for the parent of a child taken out of the UK illegally.

Our nationwide network of specialist lawyers will give initial free advice on all matters relating to UK divorce and matrimonial disputes including dissolution of marriage, separation, injunctions, finance and agreements and court orders relating to custody and access to children without further obligation. If after talking to us you decide not to take matters further you are under no obligation to do so and you will not be charged anything at all.