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Cookies Policy

Our website uses cookies. [We will ask you to consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy when you first visit our website. By using our website and agreeing to this policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy ].

(1) Credit

This document was created using an SEQ Legal template.

(2) About cookies

A cookie is a file containing an identifier (a string of letters and numbers) that is sent by a web server to a web browser, and stored by the browser. The identifier is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server.

Cookies can be used by web servers to identity and track users as they navigate different pages on a website and to identify users returning to a website.

Cookies may be either "persistent" cookies or "session" cookies. A persistent cookie consists of a text file sent by a web server to a web browser, which will be stored by the browser and will remain valid until its set expiry date (unless deleted by the user before the expiry date). A session cookie, on the other hand, will expire at the end of the user session, when the web browser is closed.

1. This cookies policy template will help you to comply with the law relating to web cookies.

The key piece of legislation in the UK relating to cookies is the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003. The cookies policy will also help you to comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 insofar as it affects the use of web cookies.

Regulation 6 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (as amended) provides that:

"(1) Subject to paragraph (4), a person shall not store or gain access to information stored, in the terminal equipment of a subscriber or user unless the requirements of paragraph (2) are met.

(2) The requirements are that the subscriber or user of that terminal equipment - (a) is provided with clear and comprehensive information about the purposes of the storage of, or access to, that information; and (b) has given his or her consent.

(3) Where an electronic communications network is used by the same person to store or access information in the terminal equipment of a subscriber or user on more than one occasion, it is sufficient for the purposes of this regulation that the requirements of paragraph (2) are met in respect of the initial use.

(4) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to the technical storage of, or access to, information - (a) for the sole purpose of carrying out or facilitating the transmission of a communication over an electronic communications network; or (b) where such storage or access is strictly necessary for the provision of an information society service requested by the subscriber or user."

This cookies policy should be used in conjunction with or as a part of a full privacy policy.

Please note that, in order to use this template, you may need to speak to your web developer about the cookies used on your website and the purposes for which they are used. Obviously, if your website does not use cookies, you will not need a cookies policy.

The inclusion of this statement in your privacy policy will not necessarily satisfy the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 as regards consent to the use of cookies. Guidance concerning methods of obtaining such consent is included on the Information Commissioner's website (http://www.ico.gov.uk).

2. The inclusion of this statement in your privacy policy will not necessarily satisfy the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 as regards consent to the use of cookies. Guidance concerning methods of obtaining such consent is included on the Information Commissioner's website (http://www.ico.gov.uk).

(3) Cookies on this website

We use [both/only] [session cookies] [and] [persistent cookies] on this website.

(4) How we use cookies

Cookies do not contain any information that personally identifies you, but personal information that we store about you may be linked, by us, to the information stored in and obtained from cookies.

We may use the information we obtain from your use of our cookies for the following purposes:

(1) [to recognise your computer when you visit our website;]

(2) [to track you as you navigate our website, and to enable the use of the [specify feature - e.g. shopping cart] on our website;]

(3) [to improve the website's usability;]

(4) [to analyse the use of our website;]

(5) [in the administration of this website;]

(6) [to prevent fraud and improve the security of the website;]

(7) [to personalise our website for you[, including targeting advertisements which may be of particular interest to you]].

(5) Third party cookies

When you use our website, you may also be sent third party cookies.

Our [advertisers/service providers] may send you cookies. They may use the information they obtain from your use of their cookies:

(1) [to track your browser across multiple websites;]

(2) [to build a profile of your web surfing;]

(3)[to target advertisements which may be of particular interest to you.]

[In addition, we use [Google Analytics] to analyse the use of this website. [Google Analytics] generates statistical and other information about website use by means of cookies, which are stored on users' computers. The information generated relating to our website is used to create reports about the use of the website. [Google] will store this information. [Google's] privacy policy is available at: [http://www.google.com/privacypolicy.html.]] ]

3. Specify here the uses to which you will put cookies and the data that you collect from cookies.

4. If you do not use Google Analytics, you should check whether your analytics system uses cookies and include an appropriate explanatory paragraph if it does.

[Our advertising services providers may send you cookies for the purpose of enabling the service of advertisements based on your previous visits to our website.]

[We publish Google Adsense interest-based advertisements on our website. These are tailored by Google to reflect your interests. To determine your interests, Google will track your behaviour on our website and on other websites across the web using the DART cookie. You can view, delete or add interest categories associated with your browser using Google's Ads Preference Manager, available at: http://www.google.com/ads/preferences/. You can opt-out of the Adsense partner network cookie at: http://www.google.com/privacy/ads/ or using the NAI's (Network Advertising Initiative's) multi-cookie opt-out mechanism at: http://www.networkadvertising.org/managing/opt_out.asp. However, these opt-out mechanisms use cookies, and if you clear the cookies from your browser your opt-out will not be maintained. To ensure that an opt-out is maintained in respect of a particular browser, you should use the Google browser plug-in available at: http://www.google.com/ads/preferences/plugin.]

(6) Blocking cookies

Most browsers allow you to refuse to accept cookies. For example:

(1) in Internet Explorer you can refuse all cookies by clicking "Tools", "Internet Options", "Privacy", and selecting "Block all cookies" using the sliding selector;

(2) in Firefox you can block all cookies by clicking "Tools", "Options", and un-checking "Accept cookies from sites" in the "Privacy" box.

Blocking all cookies will, however, have a negative impact upon the usability of many websites. [If you block cookies, you will not be able to use the [identify feature(s)] on this website.]

(7) Deleting cookies

You can also delete cookies already stored on your computer:

(1) in Internet Explorer, you must manually delete cookie files (you can find instructions for doing so at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/278835);

(2) in Firefox, you can delete cookies by, first ensuring that cookies are to be deleted when you "clear private data" (this setting can be changed by clicking "Tools", "Options" and "Settings" in the "Private Data" box) and then clicking "Clear private data" in the "Tools" menu.

Doing this may have a negative impact on the usability of many websites.

(8) Contact us

This website is owned and operated by Copyright © ohhoo.com. All Rights Reserved 2012.

Divorce in Northern Ireland

Quick Enquiry

The rules for divorce in Northern Ireland are very similar to those in England, Scotland and Wales however the most obvious difference is that a couple may not petition within the first 2 years of the marriage (unlike in England and Wales where it is 1 year and in Scotland there is no time limit). A petition for judicial separation may be lodged at the court at any time after the marriage. The initial court order is called a ‘decree nisi’ which is granted once the petitioner has proved the allegations however this does not terminate the marriage which requires the issue of the ‘decree absolute’ available, upon application, six weeks after the grant by the court of the decree nisi.

There is just one ground for divorce in Northern Ireland which is irretrievable breakdown of marriage proved by one or more of the following facts which also apply to proceedings for judicial separation :-

  1. two years separation with the consent of the other spouse to divorce
  2. five years separation without the consent of the other spouse to divorce
  3. unreasonable behaviour
  4. adultery
  5. desertion whereby the respondent has deserted the petitioner for a period of at least two years

If a couple cannot agree on financial arrangements after divorce or judicial separation the courts have wide discretionary powers to make orders in respect of finance, maintenance and property adjustments. There are no hard and fast rules regarding the division of property and assets however the court must take into account the present and future needs, resources and earning capacity of both husband and wife, their age, the length of their marriage and the contributions of each to the family finances. The courts are encouraged to affect a clean break whereby neither the husband nor the wife will claim maintenance or capital from the other in the future. If a clean break cannot be affected due to inadequate assets being available then maintenance can be awarded which may be for either an indefinite period or for a specified time after which there will be a clean break.

The legislation regarding maintenance for natural children, after divorce in Northern Ireland, is contained in the Child Support (Northern Ireland) Order 1991 which outlines a formula to calculate the minimum level of child maintenance payable by the absent parent. The court can however, where justified by parental income, award a higher or lower figure upon application. In the case of other children not covered by this legislation an application for maintenance to the Child Support Agency will be necessary if the figures cannot be agreed by consent. In cases where the custodial parent is in receipt of certain state benefits the DSS requires the Child Support Agency to assess, collect and enforce maintenance payments for children.

Our nationwide network of specialist lawyers will give initial free advice on all matters relating to dissolution of marriage, separation, injunctions, finance and agreements and court orders relating to custody and access to children without further obligation. If after talking to us you decide not to take matters further you are under no obligation to do so and you will not be charged anything at all.